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WHO: COVID-19 Pandemic Now Driven By Young Age Groups

COVID-19

International: The World Health Organization (WHO) is showing concern about the fact that COVID-19 is now driven by young age groups. People in their 20s, 30s, and 40s are now in the driving seat in the spread of COVID-19. Many of them are asymptomatic thus posing a threat to vulnerable groups.

The WHO officials made an announcement that the proportion of infected among the younger groups has risen globally. This sudden rise has put to risk the population worldwide. This includes the elderly and sick people in densely populated areas with poor medical facilities.

Takeshi Kasai, WHO Western Pacific director in a virtual briefing has stated that the pandemic is changing rapidly.
The spread of the virus in people of age group 20s, 30s, and 40s is spreading very rapidly. Also, many are unaware that they are being infected, Takeshi stated in the briefing. He also stated that people have entered a new phase of the pandemic in the Asia-Pacific region.

Many countries have been forced to re-impose restrictions due to the rise in new COVID-19 cases. Till now, the virus has infected more than 22 million people worldwide. The total number of deaths till now is 784,353.
The United States has the highest number of COVID-19 cases with a case count of 5,481,795. Brazil is in the second position with 3,407,354 total cases.
On the list of total COVID-19 cases, India is in third. Till now Russia has 930,276 cases, while South Africa has 592,144 infections.

In India, the total COVID-19 cases in the last 24 hours are 64,531. Now the total number of cases in India is 27,67,274 and the total number of deaths is 52,889.
Maharashtra, New Delhi, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh are the states with the highest number of cases in the country.

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Written by Headline8 Desk

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